AGE OF DAWN REVIEWS

 
 
 
 

5 Stars

by MSSantos

This is a beautiful story that takes place in a magical and delicious world. Looking forward to reading more stories about these furry food lovers!


5 Stars

by Sandie

The gentle Rumplings live happily in their little world until a rogue Rumpling wants to change their way of life. It's a lovely story for children with a message very relevant for today's world.


5 stars

by Em145

Lovely read for book lovers and food lovers alike. The book was full of originality - from the cute furry characters to the religion they follow. It's a great one to read with your children and explore the Rumpling world together. Already can't wait for the next installment.


 
 
 
 

4 stars

by José Seruya

Enjoyed immensely this first book by Francisco. Very humane, simple, easy to read, straight to your heart. A tale on leadership, too - on a very likely dawn of an informal leader.


5 stars

by Margarida Seruya Santos

This is a beautiful story that takes place in a magical and delicious world. Looking forward to reading more stories about these furry food lovers!


5 stars

by Emily Snape

I have just read this book, and would really recommend it! The new world the author has created really captures the imagination, the characters are excellent role models and the illustrations complement it perfectly. A lovely book for grown ups and children to enjoy together, and hopefully just the start of the Rumplings' Adventure!


 
 

5 stars

by Amazon Customer

The Rumplings is a wonderfully original children’s fiction story, which immediately draws you in with the Rumplings’ first appearance. They are strange, furry creatures who live in a fantastical world called Terra, and their world funnily enough revolves around food.

Rocket, the protagonist, is sensible, rational and has the ability to look past temptation and see things for what they truly are. All in all, Rocket is good. He displays his moral qualities throughout the story when he tries to stop the other Rumplings from giving into the temptation of free food and housing. This temptation comes from the antagonist Snifer and the Church of Food, who are represented as bad - which I found interesting. Moreira, like many children’s fiction authors, uses forms of good and evil to teach children right from wrong. The House of Food and Flavour is good as it upholds the tradition of working hard and being humble, whereas the Church of Food attempts to lure in Rumplings under the pretence that they never have to work again.

Moreira cleverly combines issues of society and religion with fictional places and beings in a way that teaches children important morals while enjoying the story at the same time. The book encourages thinking for yourself and working hard for what you want, while being grateful for what you do have. Nothing good comes easy, as the saying goes!

A few words at first seemed a little too complex for children of a young age, such as ‘naturalistic’ or ‘intricate’. However, I realised that this would encourage children to learn the meaning of these words, and thereby they would take away more than just moral lessons from the story.

The ending was the part I especially loved because it was a totally unexpected plot twist! The last line changes the whole perspective of the story and really shows how there is wonder to be found in even the most unexpected of places. With that said, I believe that this story is very enjoyable to children, due to its inspiring characters, the strange setting, the moral lessons, and the utterly unique plot.


4 stars

by G Bolwell

Rocket loves his life, his religion, and his sister. A true and honest Rumpling, Rocket just wishes to live his life in peace, working in the Mines and avoiding the terrifying Swoop, which took his parents. But there are other Rumplings who are not so happy with the prescribed order and who seek a better life. One Rumpling, Snifer, rises above the others to try and improve their lives, but things do not go well...

This is a charming story with a strong moral about greed and integrity. Suitable for children of around 6 and up, this little story is highly enjoyable and is an excellent way of teaching children about the value of honesty, forgiveness, and helping those in need.

The writing style itself is quite good, although there are times when the story moves between overly simplified and slightly too complex for smaller children. I enjoyed the light tone of the story and the younger characters, Jodie and Elodie, brought a relatable element for young readers.

Though there are parts of the story that perhaps may be troubling to particularly young readers, the majority of the tale is good and, as I have said, carries a strong and valuable message.

Overall, the writing style is good, the story is pleasant, and the few little illustrations throughout the book are a brilliant addition. I will rate this story 4 out of 5 stars.


5 stars

by Amazon Customer

The Rumplings The Age of Dawn is a truly heart-warming children’s novel about courage, strength and helping others, even when it seems like they may not deserve it. During this tale, we follow the life of Rocket, a young and kind-souled Rumpling. He and his sister Elodie lost their parents at a young age due to unfortunate circumstances, and since this day, Rocket has taken it upon himself to look out for Elodie in every way he can. He has taken up work in the dangerous food mines, and brings home as much food as possible to Elodie to help her with her experiments. This sense of responsibility has made Rocket a very caring and thoughtful Rumpling, and as the novel progresses it can be seen that Rocket looks out for the rest of the Rumpling community too.

I really enjoyed reading the first novel in The Rumplings’ story, and I found their home land of Káer to be a very imaginative place which you can quite easily get lost in. As a children’s novel, I really liked that the story showed all sides of human (or Rumpling) nature. The story has the great moral that the easy way of life is not always the right way of life. In order to live the life you think you deserve, everyone should work hard to do their part for the community. The novel also contains religious conflicts in a way that’s easy for children to understand, by exemplifying that even though two Rumplings may have different beliefs, they will always help one another in a time of need.

Even as an adult reader, I thoroughly enjoyed the twist at the end of the novel and found it to be a very creative and original idea. I won’t say too much, but I think younger readers will definitely find joy in this revelation too! The language used throughout the novel is suitable for young readers, and can be used to teach children how to read. The beautiful illustrations provided throughout the novel can help with this as they really entail the story the author is trying to depict. This is the type of novel I would love to pass on to my younger sister as it has a strong moral along with being a truly lovely story.

Had I read this as I child, I have no doubt it would have been a story I delighted in because even as an adult, I believe it is one that will stick with me. I look forward to reading more stories about these cute furry-faced creatures in the near future!


3 stars

by Amazon Customer

‘The Rumplings: Age of Dawn’ is a fantastical short story for young children. With numerous pages of block text, I would age this book as suitable for children aged 7-9. With the occasional illustration acting as welcome relief on the somewhat heavy narrative, the book balances the challenging moral teachings and text with a maintained appeal to childlike senses. Francisco Moreira, an aspiring fantasy author, creates the perfect melange of comedy, action and moral teaching in The Rumplings, allowing the child reader to feel both entertained and inspired.

The book unfolds as a traditional ‘hero vs villain’ plotline, with Rocket featuring as the protagonist-hero and Snifer acting as the greedy villain. Throughout the story the narrative highlights the reasons the reader is to root for Rocket and why they should dislike Snifer: describing Rocket’s selflessness, generosity, honesty and loyalty to his faith and pinning Snifer as the opposite. As a greedy, selfish and dishonest villain, who is also identified as a cause of the tragedy surrounding Rocket’s parents, Snifer acts as the example of the morally corrupt. This obvious method of creating a moralistic divide, serves its function in educating the young reader on what qualities are valued in a person (or Rumpling!) As well as teaching the important values of a person, I believe the book to be very heavily directed towards promoting the importance of faith and religion. The Rumplings live for, work for and worship food: they have a Day of Rest service to discuss food, the Age of Famine and their current time of abundance. They thank the ‘Makers’, the story’s replacement figure for God, who provide the food each day. Throughout the story Rocket passes judgement on all those who do not attend service or who do not listen to the advice given there, and as the hero on the pedestal of morality, this judgement seems to encourage the reader to feel the same. Despite the resolution abolishing the Church of Food as an organisation, the worship and social attitudes towards the faith remains solid in the concluding teachings. Therefore in terms of the ‘heavy narrative’ earlier mentioned, I advise that this book is particularly focused on the importance of faith and morality and that this comes across through almost every page of the story. That is not to say that the book hints at a preference of any real-life religion: with the fictional faith, the teachings of the book are applicable to children who are atheist, apathetic, Christian or Hindu etc.
As a children’s book, it has a very Animal Farm feel to it, with the adorable animals in a constructed world other than our own, with an underlying message to convey to readers through entertaining and understandable ways. As well as religious undertones, to the educated adult who may accompany the child reader with the story, it can be seen how Shaman Ruffalo’s more communist opinion that everyone should share food equally rivals Snifer’s capitalist and greedy scheming.
Aware of my own mature and somewhat cynical approach to reviewing this book, I must declare that I do believe this book to be a good book for educating children as well as entertaining them. The political and religious linings of the plot are obvious only to those who look for them. Comedic events and descriptions are littered throughout the tale, with the focus on food being hilariously relatable yet simultaneously odd. The grand revelation of the situation of the Rumpling’s habitat (which I will not spoil) also adds a very light hearted tone to the ending.

To conclude, I recommend this book to a child of suitable reading ability and a desire for light-relief illustrations and silly comedy. A Roald Dahl fantasy feel encompasses this book and will spark imaginations of all those who pick up this book to read. The religious undertones are undeniably strong, but with no specified link to the real world it is refreshing to see the promotion of a harmonious Rumpling society (in the resolution) encouraging young children to simply have faith.


5 stars

by Ben Newman

Children’s literature is in a place of neglected importance. Budding writers, readers and creatives can all trace back, with a smile, to influential books they read as a child. However, the children’s literature market has become saturated by celebrity’s vanity-driven forays into literature and rich hobbyists; it really is starting to lack the sort of magic that made classic children’s stories and modern day classics so readable and robust. Thankfully, Francisco Moreira’s The Rumplings - Age of Dawn is a vintage children’s story without diving into repetition of popular children’s literature tropes – it balances modernity with the genres boundaries effortlessly. The Rumplings is a breath of fresh air with a hint of nostalgia. What keeps The Rumplings interesting is the original themes it raises whilst ensuring it stays embedded in a relatable children’s literature aesthetic.

The Rumplings tells the story of a group of furry creatures in a world where food is religion. The book follows Rocket, a heroic Rumpling, who becomes suspicious when a new organisation – The Church of Food – begins to promise people unlimited food and free housing in return for worship. The Rumplings begin to question their entire order in the face of apparent paradise, but at a cost. The plot is highly unique and remains good humoured, but is thematically complex by children’s literature standards. The themes the plot raises, however, are translated in a way that ensures they remain understandable for young readers without damaging the theme’s complexity.

The Rumplings raises complicated, but important, themes for a young reader. Issues relating to our choice of food, politics, work and faith are explored throughout the novel. The theme of food is especially modern and pertinent. Having children think about their food choices on a geopolitical and environmental level may seem a bit heavy, but these topics are especially important now and in their future. The theme of food, thankfully, is not as starkly intellectualised and wordy as this review’s description of it; the themes remain simple without delving too much into complexity.

The writing style is breezy and simple. Essentially, it is highly readable with a good amount of flair from Moreira. The vocabulary can perhaps be a little too complicated for very young readers, but with adult assistance it should be fine. The language never gets too repetitive and the book, overall, proves to be a good exercise in improving a child’s vocabulary and language skills. In terms of difficulty, the book should be fine for children around the ages of seven and above. The inclusion of some illustrations breaks up the text for a younger reader, but it also helps to outline Moreira’s visual aesthetic for the novel. The illustrations, too, mirror the creativity and charm of the text. The Rumplings is fun for young readers, but also deceptively useful to both their imagination and language.

Overall, I highly recommend The Rumplings to a younger audience. It is fresh, but it carries the familiar warmth of a good children’s book ensuring it remains re-readable for the future.


5 stars

by Amazon Customer

I really enjoyed visiting the Rumplings world and reading such a beautiful story. Eager to read more stories about these sweet food lovers!


5 stars

by Amazon Customer

This is a lovely story, specially if you're a foodie like me! Great not only for children, but also for all adults that enjoy a joyful and imaginative read. I loved the powerful messages it transmits subtly, and the beautiful images that accompany it. Definitely recommend it!


5 stars

by C LIM

I really enjoyed the story about The Rumplings. It teaches us very simple moral lessons that we forget everyday or take for granted. I would definitely recommend this to everyone (not just Children) for leisure reading during the weekend.


5 stars

by Maria F

Such a sweet story, based on everything we should value. I hope that there will be many more stories with The Rumplings, and that this is only the beginning!


5 stars

by S Smith

A gentle tale with a message about greed, and the consequences for a community of Rumplings. I love it so much I have three copies to send as presents this Christmas!